What's happening

Cubans in the streets push back the police of the dictatorship

The protests of Cubans inflamed by the blackout that...

Cuba in the street: What the Castro dictatorship doesn’t want the world to see

The thousands of false promises, together with the slow...

Colombia begins its path towards Castrochavism

The efforts to hide the ideological coincidence with Chavismo are a thing of the past. Gustavo Petro managed to sell himself successfully as a moderate leftist, closer to the progressivism that Gabriel Boric is testing in Chile than to the Castrochavism that he plunged Cuba and Venezuela into misery. It was precisely the union of the disastrous legacies of Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez that gave rise to the term. And despite the almost two million Venezuelan immigrants in Colombian territory who attest to the failure of socialism, the left knew how to cleverly distance itself from the Venezuelan dictatorship during the campaign to spread like a mantra the affirmation that Castrochavism does not exist and allege that it It was a fear manufactured by Uribism – a movement in which the entire right and center-right were pigeonholed – to scare the voters who yearned for the promised “change”.

Finally, on August 7, the new government is installed, which in reality offers little news, since most of the officials announced to be part of the cabinet come from the administration of former President Juan Manuel Santos, who –by the way– recently arrived at the Casa de Nariño in 2010 he called Chavez his “new best friend.” But it was one of the most recent appointments that raised the ghost of Castrochavism. Gustavo Petro announced this Saturday the name of Gloria Inés Ramírez as head of the Ministry of Labor and evidence of his admiration for the late Venezuelan dictator and messages of political support for the current occupant of the Miraflores Palace soon appeared on social networks.

Petro Minister promised to “defend the Bolivarian revolutionary process”

“We would like the ideas of Chávez, Evo, Rafael Correa and all those who are building sovereign and independent homelands to be here,” the leader of the Communist Party is heard saying in a video, who even attended with the Senator Piedad Córdoba today at Chávez’s funeral in Caracas, where she said she had observed “the conviction and decision to continue defending the Bolivarian revolutionary process,” but not before adding that she also joined in “defending the revolution.” And she has done so. After Chávez’s death, she has continued to support Nicolás Maduro with countless messages on social networks.

But this is not the only sign of the arrival of Castrochavism to power in Colombia. In the swearing-in ceremony of the former guerrilla as president, the sword of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, stolen in 1974 by the M-19 – the criminal group to which Petro belonged – appears with a prominent role, thus highlighting the same Bolivarianism that Chavismo appropriated in Venezuela, at the initiative of the new president.

He did Castrochavism

Another detail that cannot go under the table is the fact that his chancellor, Álvaro Leyva Duran, outlined the priorities of the new administration shortly after his appointment. The first thing he did was travel to Venezuela to hold a meeting with Maduro’s foreign minister, Carlos Faría, as well as with the governor of the border state of Táchira, Chavista Freddy Bernal. He then proceeded to meet with his counterpart from Iran, a country allied with the Venezuelan regime and on which the United States weighs harsh sanctions for links to terrorism.

They say that children always tell the truth. And perhaps it was what the youngest daughter of Gustavo Petro did four years ago, that during the 2018 presidential campaign, in which he was defeated by Iván Duque, she stopped in the middle of an interview on W Radio to sing with apparent irony: “towards Castrochavism”, to then go to a corner of the stage and add that he was placing himself “to the extreme left”.

Latest

Cubans in the streets push back the police of the dictatorship

The protests of Cubans inflamed by the blackout that...

Cuba in the street: What the Castro dictatorship doesn’t want the world to see

The thousands of false promises, together with the slow...

Don't miss

The Cuban regime must be expelled from the UN Human Rights Council

Political alignments are valid as long as they do...

Only the end of the Cuban dictatorship will end the opprobrium of political prisoners

The political prisoners of the Cuban regime are a fundamental part of its survival mechanism, they are the mechanism with which they produce fear in the population to achieve submission behaviors that would not otherwise be possible and they are the capital of international negotiation...

Communism: the religion of idiots

When speaking of socialism, two criteria are opposed. The...

The sale of foreign currency is yet another distraction of the dictatorship to buy time

“They are not going to sell dollars. They are...

The Cuban obsession with Venezuelan oil

The obsession of Fidel Castro and the entire Cuban...
José Martí
José Martí
Nacionalista cubano, poeta, filósofo, ensayista, periodista, traductor, profesor y editor.

The Cuban dictatorship repressed for the fourth consecutive day peaceful protesters who ask for freedom

The collapse of the communist system in Cuba and the inability of the Castro dictatorship to provide any solution, provoked the fourth night of...

Cubans in the streets push back the police of the dictatorship

The protests of Cubans inflamed by the blackout that has kept the island in the dark since Wednesday have made the police forces of...

The Cuban dictatorship increased censorship on the island and cut off the internet again to silence the protests

The chaos left in Cuba by Hurricane Ian and the collapse of the Cuban communist system, added to problems in the water supply and...

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here